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20110721
20110721
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of afghanistan and iraq. >> the republicans we have on the show say they are open to the loophole cuts. are they? >> tom coburn is. he provides a lot of cover. >> i was wondering what mike was quoting. how many pages can you get read in the seventh inning stretch? >> it's in between innings. it's the entire game. >> the tough thing for president obama, he's going to say he will extend the deadline, if it looks like a deal is coming together. this, to me, is the difficult part. if all he had to deal with was the senate, i have no doubt in the next week you would have a deal that would work. the house is difficult. he's going to need to know from nancy pelosi and john boehner the votes are in place. today, not even close to that. >> you will lose 100, maybe 120 republicans right out. if you get most of the democratic caucus and boehner pulls in 100 republicans, it gets done. it's up to the democrats. i think boehner can get 100 republicans. can pelosi get 120 democrats? >> right. okay. we are going to get to bill karins on the heat in a minute. before we go, new developments in the hacking scandal
intended to fund projects in afghanistan may be going to extremists, killing u.s. troops. a government audit finds billions of dollars literally disappearing and, now, possibly ending up in the hands of insurgents, molly henneberg is live in washington. hi, molly. what are the problems tracking u.s. money dispersed to afghan. >> reporter: there's a number of them, neither u.s. agencies nor afghan commercial banks record the serial numbers of cash or money transfers, paid to contractors or others in afghanistan. making it tough to track where the dollars go. once they are in afghanistan. also, according to an audit by herbert richardson, the acting special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction, contractors are not prohibited from using unlicensed middle men to pay subcontractors. richardson wrote in a statement, the u.s. poured billions of aid dollars into a country plagued by corruption, insurgency and the narcotics trade and it is essential that we use all available tools to ensure that u.s. dollars are protected from fraud and diversion to the insurgency. he said at the st
with more "happening now" "happening now" " jon: there is a brand-new -- we're talking about afghanistan, guys, is that what we're doing? all right. a brand-new report on the war in afghanistan finds that billions of taxpayer collars sent over there may have ended up in the hands of terrorists. jennifer griffin has that live from the pentagon. jennifer. >> reporter: hi, jon. well there are a lot of examples of corruption that has already been reported on in the past, but one principle example that this report outlines is remember at the kabul international airport, afghan vip's were literally putting millions of dollars in suitcases and taking them out of kabul to banks in the gulf states in dubai. the u.s. trerb kraoe ride to help the hamid karzai government crackdown on that, what happened according to those reports is the vip's bypassed the airport taking their vehicles on to the tarmac of the airport and onto the planes and loading the bags. it got so dangerous, there were so many vehicles on the tarmac that they scrapped the plans to looking into vip's bags. there are millions of do
taxpayer dollars are vanishing in afghanistan. likely in the hands of those trying to kill our troops. that is according to a new audit. the u.s. agencies limited oversight on the cash that enters the afghan economy, leaving it open to fraud, or diversion to the insurgency. late this afternoon, the senate unanimously passed a bill to extend the term of f.b.i. director robert mueller by two years. number of republicans originally voiced concerns, but by this morning, kentucky senator rand paul was the lone hold-out. after meeting with mueller, paul was satisfied. the president must formally send up the nomination. fear of pirates is having a big impact on the world economy. we will explain. but first, early look at president obama's re-election effort. [ male announcer ] this...is the network -- a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more amecans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new ce
billion in iraq and afghanistan to train the security forces, less than $10 billion to retrain our work force for the jobs of the future. well, mr. president, i see others have come on the floor. i'll wrap this up. deficit reduction is important. i'm not saying it isn't. but it is not the single-most important thing right now. the single-most important thing is to put people back to work. that will, as senator wyden said earlier, start to create the demand. it will spur more private investment as the federal government begins to invest in the future of this country. that's where we ought to be focusing on. once we get the wheels going again, once we get people back to work and the economy start to to -- starts to grow, that's when we start to reduce the deficit. to just focus on deficit reduction right now to the exclusion of putting people back to work reminds me of when doctors used to put leaches on people who were ill. it only made them more ill because it drained more blood out of their system. and most times proved fatal, as it did to our first president, george washington. our ur
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)